Newsletter

Counselling myths

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MYTH 1 - What about Confidentiality? Someone will find out, my boss and colleagues will know.

Although the EAP counselling sessions are paid for by your employer, the counsellors are independent and anything you discuss with a counsellor is confidential unless; there is a risk of harm to you or someone else or disclosure is required by law. While we do need to collect a few details from you when booking your first appointment, your personal information is kept confidential. AccessEAP has refused to work with organisations who cannot accept our confidentiality code of conduct. Your organisation respects the privacy and confidentiality of the services provided to you to improve your wellbeing.

MYTH 2 - If I have a problem my friends and family will talk/help me through it.

Although you may receive support from family and friends one difference between speaking with a counsellor and a close friend is that the counsellor has a broad knowledge and understanding of human behaviour. Sometimes it also just helps to speak with someone objective who isn’t emotionally involved with you or the situation.

MYTH 3 - I should see a counsellor only if things get really bad.

It’s better to recognise the warning signs and speak to a counsellor before you feel completely overwhelmed. Often early intervention via professional counselling support leads to better outcomes sooner and keeps you on a healthy track, preventing problems in the future. However, counselling becomes particularly important if you experience:

  • Sleep problems and exhaustion
  • Loss of appetite
  • Depression or anxiety
  • Social isolation
  • Using food, drugs or alcohol to relax

MYTH 4 - Counsellors only work with people with a mental illness.

Challenging life events happen to us all at some point – no one is immune. Counselling actually helps you deal with life’s everyday problems without waiting for them to become out of control. You may be facing work pressures like managing deadlines, meeting targets and/or handling an office conflict, while finding it hard to fulfil your personal and family commitments. Counselling can also help you address personal issues that may be impacting your ability to do your job well. These can include:

  • Relationships
  • Stress and anxiety
  • Depression
  • Anger
  • Grief and loss
  • Major life changes
  • Parenting issues
  • Physical or emotional abuse
  • Drugs and alcohol

MYTH 5 - As a leader, I should be able to handle problems on my own – I shouldn’t have to ask for help.

Today’s workplace is complex, leaders are expected to manage difficult situations and people both of which can be quite taxing and tough. Good bosses know that great leadership comes from supporting and developing the best people for the job. Sometimes speaking with a professional can help provide evidence-based tools, structure and objectivity to a situation. The decision-making lies squarely in the hands of the leader but an AccessEAP counsellor can give the insights, tools and resources to support your decision making.

If you would like to book an appointment, call AccessEAP on 1800 818 728.

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AccessEAP acknowledges the traditional custodians of the land we work on and their continuing connection to land, culture and community. We pay our respects to Elders past, present and future. 
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples using this content are advised that it may contain images, names or voices of people who have passed away
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indig_flags.jpg

AccessEAP acknowledges the traditional custodians of the land we work on and their continuing connection to land, culture and community. We pay our respects to Elders past, present and future. 
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples using this content are advised that it may contain images, names or voices of people who have passed away.